Fighting Anxiety Part II

Fighting Anxiety Part 2Welcome to the Part II of our series on anxiety!  So, which type of anxiety are you experiencing? I was not aware that there were so many of them! I have here some resources where you are able to use a checklist to help explain each one.
According to authorities on the subject who have received several accolades for their unparalleled efforts to alleviate this issue, there are 6 most common anxiety disorders and you will also find checklists to help you recognize the symptoms. (credits to Understanding Anxiety and BeyondBlue.org)

Generalised anxiety disorder (GAD)
This is where a person feels anxious and worried for a period of six months or more.
Checklist: http://understandinganxiety.org.au/about/symptoms-checklist/generalised-anxiety

Social phobia
This is when a person experiences an intense fear of being criticized, embarrassed or humiliated, even in everyday situations. They are worried about speaking to others in all types of regular situations in activities of daily living: at the store, pumping gas, at work, at school, etc.

Specific phobias
This person is afraid of a particular object or situation and may go to great lengths to avoid it. There are several types of phobias.
Checklist: http://understandinganxiety.org.au/phobia-symptoms-checklist

Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD)
“A person has ongoing unwanted/intrusive thoughts and fears that cause anxiety.” The way this person deals with the anxiety is by displaying certain behaviors or engage in “rituals
Checklist: http://understandinganxiety.org.au/ocd-symptoms-checklist

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
“This can happen after a person experiences a traumatic event (e.g. war, assault, accident, disaster). Symptoms can include difficulty relaxing, upsetting dreams or flashbacks of the event, and avoidance of anything related to the event. PTSD is diagnosed when a person has symptoms for at least a month.”
Checklist: http://understandinganxiety.org.au/post-traumatic-stress-disorder-symptoms

Panic disorder
This is described as a person experiences severe panic attacks where they have uncontrollable feelings of anxiety. There is also a physical impact on the person at the time of a panic attack like dizziness, shortness of breath, pain, etc. If this persist over a month, this person can be diagnosed as having a panic disorder.
Checklist: http://understandinganxiety.org.au/about/symptoms-checklist/panic-disorder

So there you have it. I have been researching more about this macabre problem to find solace. It can be a crippling disease! So many people are affected by it and while more prominent, it is not as well-known as depression…
Stress and anxiety are trying to take control of our lives but we will NOT have it! Let’s arm ourselves with knowledge and in the next and last post, let’s find ways to combat them. Are you up to it?

Fighting Anxiety Part 2Before we jump in, I have to let you know that this will be a journey. Throughout my research, it points out that people have to stay vigilant and keep using the tools provided to them. It is like having to drink water, or brush your teeth everyday: keep using those tools everyday. So if you find yourself engulfed by anxiety, you will not only have to dig yourself out from under it, but you also will have to KEEP yourself out from under it.

Stay tuned, my friends. As much as we support each other, we WILL triumph together.
Keep your Faith alive,
M

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65 Responses to “Fighting Anxiety Part II”

  1. Robin Rue (@massholemommy) Reply July 22, 2015 at 11:36 am

    I get anxious sometimes, but it’s nothing I can’t handle. I like to know what I am going into, but obviously that is not always possible.

  2. I look forward to reading about your journey. I hope I see more positives than negatives in your future. Anxiety can be a crippling thing.

    • Thank you Stacie! There is a LOT of positive in my life but when suffering from anxiety, it gets clouded… In sharing information about this issue, I hope more people will pursue more education on the subject and get the help they need 🙂
      The future looks AMAZING!

  3. Thanks for sharing this! I know a lot of people who could read it to learn more.

  4. Thank you for sharing all of this information! I know a lot of people with anxiety disorders and it isn’t an easy thing to go through.

  5. Anxiety is absolutely dreadful. It is not something easy to overcome, especially when on alert.

  6. I used to have panic attacks back in college. My husband occasionally has anxiety problems where he can’t sleep. I realized there were a difference between the two things, but still both are mentally troubling and any help anyone can provide is nice. I have since cured myself of them. My husband still gets anxiety every now and then.

    • I truly hope your hubby gets some help and conquers his anxiety, Heather! Check out the next post and I hope you can maybe share some of the resources with him 🙂

  7. I have had a bit of anxiety lately and I have found that essential oils really help. I use them aromatically and topically and they are really soothing and calming!

  8. I get anxious, too – it’s probably more of a generalized anxiety issue. And when I’m stressed I can’t sleep. Wow, there are a lot of types out there. I didn’t realize. Three cheers for a peaceful existence.

    • Thank you Carol! Sleep is one of the great indicators of anxiety… The more educated we are on the subject, the more we can learn how to deal with it.

  9. My husband gets anxious especially around big crowds and balloons. His personality can change in a flash.

    • I am sorry to hear about that Shaney. I hope you are able to find some support in helping the situation. In the post that follows, I will be providing some resources to help 🙂

  10. I get anxiety from time to time. It almost feels like someone is taking your breath away or your heart is going to jump out of your chest. I love that people are openly talking about it so that others understand how crippling it can be.

    • Definitely Christy! The more we talk about it and look for ways to care for it, the more educated we get, the better chances to improve our lives!

  11. I think anxiety is now becoming a part of our lives. We really have to find ways to combat and deal with it.

  12. I have a social phobia, I distance myself from other people when in public. Anxiety sucks.

    • Oh, Chubskulit Rose! It is sucky, but there is a way to work on it and improve. I hope you can find it where you are and commit to making the change for the better 🙂

  13. I get anxious at times, but it’s something normal for me. It’s nothing serious. I did hear about stories of serious anxiety attacks among people which is really sad.

  14. I get anxious at times, too, but it’s nothing serious. I do a lot of breathing whenever it happens.

  15. I think a little social anxiety can be a blessing. It makes us try harder. We all want to be accepted and liked.

  16. This is great information. I get huge anxiety when storms start rolling in. Even when I know they aren’t really suppose to be bad.

    • Thank you Jacqui! Sometimes anxiety does not have any rhyme or reason… The best is to get to the root of it: why is it that storms have such an impact on you? My hope is that you are able to get help to deal with this fear.

  17. I suffer from generalized anxiety disorder, PTSD, and panic disorder (attacks.) All stem from childhood abuse. I have been in and out of therapy , off and on medications. I also have chronic manic depression (now known more as bipolar) and its a struggle to get through most days. Education is key for everyone, not just those who struggle.

    • Amen Chrystal! You are right on the money on this and it is the reason for my posts on the subject: Educating everyone about this. I am sorry to hear about abuse being at the root of your anxiety… I wish you the best in dealing with anxiety, seeking and receiving help makes a huge difference in the lives of the ones experiencing anxiety 🙂

  18. I battle with this sometimes. Mostly since I lost so many family and friends in a short span of time. It’s getting better.

  19. People experience anxiety but that does not mean they have a disorder, it is important to seek medical help if the anxiety is becoming frequent. And as you mention anxiety isn’t always depression, often times I think Web MD causes more problems than it solves and has people thinking they have all kinds of disorders! Great share!

    • Thank you Tracy! Indeed it is IMPORTANT to talk to your doctor about any of this if experiencing it. Going online and blindly believing what is being shared is not safe nor smart… Learning about symptoms and about what we experience has to be coupled with an expert’s consultation: your doctors.

  20. Anxiety can be pretty scary. It’s good to have a list of the different ways we can struggle with this. Thanks for sharing this.

  21. Aww.. this makes me feel really terrible for those who truly suffer from anxiety, vs hearing from those that only complain about life, rather than really having a disorder.

  22. I do know someone who just had an anxiety attack. He thought it was a heart attack.

    • Sometimes it seems that way for certain people. It is important to get some help when experiencing this feeling. It is real to them, and very intense.

  23. I’m HORRIBLE in crowds or places where I am alone with or without the kids. It makes me almost panic and shut down. It’s a battle I encounter on a daily basis as well.

    • Goodness! I have to say, this is the worst… But there are ways to deal with this issue and I hope you are able to glean some information on this very subject in the next post, Jessica.

  24. I have slight anxiety. I can get very anxious at times and it’s so frustrating. I do wish you well on your journey to overcoming this.

  25. This is an awesome post and great information. I have not been diagnosed with PTSD but I have the symptoms and my sister was diagnosed with it do to events in our childhood. I have always had anxiety since childhood but I have also been diagnosed with ADHD too. Thanks for sharing.

    • You are welcome Rebecca! I am sorry to hear that you have had traumatic events in your lives to cause PTSD symptoms… I Hope the next post will help you find some tools to effectively help you face your anxiety and manage it well!

  26. I deal with anxiety on occasion, so I know how it feels. I feel for people who deal with it constantly in their lives.

    • It is quite a difficult issue to deal with, Danielle. I hope you can catch the next post where I will be talking about some ways to deal with the anxiety.

  27. This has been very informative. I’m sure we’ve all experienced anxieties and it’s important that we know how to deal with them. Support and understanding are crucial.

    • Thank you RUSS! Indeed Support and Understanding are fundamental to help someone who is dealing with anxiety. Check out the follow-up post to see how to use those two effectively.

  28. Thank you so much for sharing this. I was recently diagnosed with Panic and Anxiety Disorder and have been feeling kind of alone about it.

    • Erin, there is a community of us!!! Please stay tuned as I will be providing some solutions to help deal with this problem. Please feel free to stay connected to MeUnfinished.com to get encouragement and affirmations to help you through the day. We also are on Facebook where at least 5 times a week I share encouraging and empowering words with the community.

  29. Anxiety can be such a crippling thing for some people. I deal with it from time to time but manage to deal with it and get past it.

    • You are in the right spot to deal with it, April! Caring for your body (Everyday Fitness and Nutrition) is one of they key ways to vanquish anxiety. Thank you!!!

  30. I usually recommend to anyone with anxiety issues to get professional help It’s just not worth trying to figure out on your own when you can get to the root of the issue.

  31. There are a lot of different components. I’ve been coming to the conclusion that I’ve been fundamentally altered by my experiences while deployed and that I’ll be dealing with post-traumatic stress for the rest of my life. Anxiety is very much a part of that.

    • First of all, THANK YOU for your service!!! Gabriel, the good news is that you are aware of it: the first step. Dealing with anxiety and all that comprises it is a major work, but there are so many ways to combat it (no puns intended). Stay tuned for the follow up post: we will be providing some solutions to get people started. Maybe you already know some of them… Keep working on taking control of anxiety, the more you do, the better you get at it! Good luck and again thank you!

  32. I just learned a ton from reading this post. I didn’t know much about anxiety at all.

    • Thank you for reading! I hope this brought much awareness to you and people around you 🙂 Please stay tuned, Camesha, there are solutions to how to harness the issue!

  33. We really have to find ways to counter anxiety. It’s not healthy and yet more and more people are affected by it.

    • You are right! Please check out the new post coming out tomorrow 8-5-15 for just that: resources you can use to learn more about the treatment options for Anxiety. I hope it will help and that you are able to share the information with others too! Thank you Peachy 🙂

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